How Verizon Wireless Defeats Your Privacy And What You Can Do About It

By | 01.11.2019

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You can now disable Verizon’s tracking ‘supercookie’ on your smartphone, but you’ll have to be proactive and follow a few simple steps. Shares Back in January, Verizon Wireless customers discovered that the company was tracking their mobile Web browsing via a “supercookie” built into their smartphones, which did not disappear even after clearing one’s browser cache. Although Verizon did not seem to put this information to any harmful or even inconvenient effect, many users still saw it as an invasion of privacy.
How Verizon Wireless defeats your privacy and what you can do about it

How Verizon and Turn defeat browser privacy protections

Hacking Incorporated: The Target is Your Wireless Data Friday, December 31st, In the Wireless Age, the image of the lone hacker hunched over his computer has given way to a far more frightening reality. Hackers are joining forces with other like-minded entrepreneurs, creating multinational organizations dedicated to cybercrime.

The annual price tag: Besides the leaders, their ranks include hackers, programmers who create malware code, vendors who deal in stolen data, fraudsters who do spamming and phishing, cashiers and tellers who control the accounts and money laundering operations and tech support. Corporate cybercriminals are known only by their screen names.

They connect through members only online forums where they exchange advice and get work. How do they earn a living?

Lessons from the Master Hacker The most infamous example of the new corporate face of hacking is Albert Gonzalez whose Internet handles were Segvec and Soupnazi. Then with two Russian partners, he moved on to hack Heartland Payment Systems, Hannaford Brothers and 7-Eleven — netting another million card numbers.

According to the government, it was the single largest hacking and online identity theft case ever prosecuted. The cybercriminals used money mules who were U. To protect yourself, make stopping identity theft a priority. What You Can Do Make sure your firewall is turned on and your security software is up to date.

Check that your web browser is configured to warn you about phishing websites. Passwords are the weakest link in protecting your confidential information. Use unique passwords for different websites and change them often. Avoid clicking on links contained in email or websites that you have no reason to trust.

Never download or install any software unless you are certain that it comes from an authentic source. Besides running antimalware software on your computer full-time, periodically scan it for malware that could have slipped through the cracks. To defeat new threats, keep your computer’s operating system, applications, and antimalware program up-to-date.

If you operate a business, make sure that sensitive data and confidential information are protected by complying with mandated security measures. Use monitoring tools to track security breaches.

This will avoid interception by malware that could be recording your Internet traffic. Data Leaks: Apple Sued Over App Privacy Friday, December 31st, Two class-action lawsuits have been filed against Apple, alleging that the company does not do enough to enforce its privacy policy or restrict use of unique IDs, which is how advertisers track and identify individuals.

This BBC News story suggests that one of the law firms may also sue Google as it feels that the Android applications leak personal data. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York. Popularity of Free Wifi Grows The Dallas-based company, which competes against Verizon Wireless, operates more than 23, hotspots nationwide. But privacy issues abound, as many smartphones support “auto-authentication” in hotspots. One important privacy step is to not check financial information i.

Another key protection is to keep your smartphone password-protected. Some analysts, surprisingly, say the dangers of being hacked are exaggerated. That’s one of the dangers of doing business. Michigan prosecutors say he illegally hacked into his wife’s computer after she filed for divorce. Attorney Crusades Against Spam Emails Wednesday, December 29th, An attorney who is “not your average Internet consumer” and sues companies he accuses of violating California’s anti-spam law is working to eradicate all forms of spam.

Google Search: When doing a Google search, a notification may appear directly under the link that warns, “This site may be compromised. Get App-Smart Tuesday, December 28th, The latest installment in the Wall Street Journal’s well-researched and growing “What They Know” series on consumer protections and online privacy reveals a startling look at the privacy protections — or lack thereof — for customers downloading various apps on their mobile smartphones. The article says people have become “all but powerless to limit the tracking” since unlike on regular computers, app users can’t opt out of mobile phone tracking or delete cookie tracking files.

Among the total apps tested, the WSJ article shows that iPhone apps transmitted more data than the apps on Android phones, though both were criticized for sharing consumer details to various ad networks. As just one example of how both systems allegedly misuse consumer privacy protections: Get App-Smart So just what are app makers doing without your knowledge? Here is a rundown of just some of the varied ways your privacy is being compromised every time you download a fun, free, or fan-favorite app: Attention Angry Birds fans.

Free and paid versions were tested on an iPhone, and users’ information and location were shared with Electronic Arts Inc. The creator of the addicting bird-battling game says it has updated its privacy policy in response to the findings.

In fact, many app developers transmit users’ locations to ad networks without asking permission. Neither Apple nor Google requires app privacy policies. The most widely shared detail was the unique ID number — think of it as a “supercookie” — assigned to every mobile phone that cannot be cleared like a computer’s cookie. That is how advertisers track everything — and in fact, a company called Traffic Marketplace admitted that it monitors smartphone users whenever it can: Ads targeted by location bring in two to five times as much money as untargeted ads.

Finally, the WSJ tested its own iPhone app and discovered it does not send information to outsiders the newspaper doesn’t have an Android phone app. One final tidbit — and perhaps the basis for another investigative piece by the WSJ — is that Apple has apparently filed a patent application to understand “known connections on one or more social-networking websites” or “publicly available information or private databases describing purchasing decisions, brand preferences.

How Far is Too Far? Part 1 of 2 Monday, December 27th, We know that Netflix keeps track of what films we watch and Amazon knows what books we read. We accept that and find that the service they provide — recommending other films and books — is surprisingly effective and useful. We can read Google’s privacy policy all we want, but do any of us know the extent of what the search giant knows about us? How much of that will be about us, as individuals? There probably is an app for that already, somewhere.

And so could a startup company, if they could figure out way to make money off it. Put these together and — if the satellite happened to have passed by at the precise time — the image could reveal your children playing in your backyard.

Or, suppose as you are walking down the street those ubiquitous security cameras were tracking your movements and suppose someone devised an app that would ring your cell phone with a discount offer from the store you were passing at that moment. Perhaps the discount applied to a high-def TV you were browsing last week. Would that be scary — someone was watching you that closely and was able to match your current location with your Internet surfing? Actually, someone is doing that right now, though with slightly different technology.

In this case, it is your own cell phone that can report your movements, and instead of a phone call they just have an ad pop up your phone. The idea is fairly new — at least to me — but there are already several companies doing it, including Xtify and Placecast. I read an article that said: Maybe we should take a step back and think critically before we get too used to it. Go back to how I started off this section. We would probably agree that having security cameras follow us from place to place is beyond what we would tolerate.

Does it make a difference if it is the cell phone in our pocket or purse that is doing the following? In Part 2 of this column, which will run on January 10, look for more information about ways technology is following us around online.

In the meantime, please feel free to leave a comment below. Fortifying Phones From Attackers Monday, December 27th, The Wall Street Journal reports on the evolving role of privacy and information security as more and more consumers and companies start doing business on their mobile devices.

Case in point: Internet Security In a WikiLeaks Age Friday, December 24th, In this interview on The Huffington Post, a security adviser warns that “large-scale attacks on individual citizens, exploiting their online lives through bank accounts, social networking, and professional networks” could aim to “disrupt our connected lives.

Archive for December, 2010

Came across a blog post on how Verizon wireless defeats privacy of the user ( Unless you are using VPN, your ISP and the DNS servers you use have a record of Verizon, in particular, does not protect its subscriber’s privacy and will. Verizon advertising partner Turn has been caught using Verizon Wireless’s . You don’t have to take my word for it, add a server side redirect on an HTTPs page. Privacy News Online Verizon Wireless users on the Verizon subreddit and Howard Forums have Netflix are being throttled to 10Mbps regardless of the speed you have paid for. Using a VPN defeats this throttling and allows you to get the Mobile data providers are currently allowed to do this type of.

How to Disable Verizon’s Wireless Tracking Supercookie

Hacking Incorporated: The Target is Your Wireless Data Friday, December 31st, In the Wireless Age, the image of the lone hacker hunched over his computer has given way to a far more frightening reality. Hackers are joining forces with other like-minded entrepreneurs, creating multinational organizations dedicated to cybercrime. The annual price tag: Besides the leaders, their ranks include hackers, programmers who create malware code, vendors who deal in stolen data, fraudsters who do spamming and phishing, cashiers and tellers who control the accounts and money laundering operations and tech support.

And the Android browser on Android 2. I think later in people will start to deploy with SNI on a wider scale.

REVIEW: How to Disable Verizon’s Wireless Tracking Supercookie | Tom’s Guide

AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon Wireless have each introduced new “early What I wanted to know is which of the upgrade plans gives the best value. .. that defeats the whole point of having a trade-in/early upgrade program. privacy features: All the new software Apple will soon deliver to your iPhone. stations, and hence, defeats any kind of man-in-the-middle attack The 4G SIM LTE is the fourth generation of wireless technology based on specifications . With Private Network, organizations can take charge of their evolving networks by . defeated its purpose, which is to “avoid the possibility of shareholders having to consider . applications that will perform well on its 4G L TE wireless broadband .. How does Verizon Wireless protect the privacy of its mobile.

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